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Citing Sources: Chicago Style

Use this guide as a resource when you cite sources.

About Chicago Style

The Chicago Manual of Style is actually comprised of two distinct styles: the Notes-Bibliography system and the Author-Date system. The basic elements for citing using either system are laid out below. If more information is needed please consult The Chicago Manual of Style, 17th edition, A Manual for Writers of Research Papers, Theses, and Dissertations, 8th edition, The Chicago Manual of Style Online and/or Ask-A-Librarian.

Chicago Style: Notes-Bibliography System

The Notes-Bibliography system is often used by those in the humanities, including literature, history and the arts. This system uses numbered footnotes to cite sources. These footnotes correspond to raised numbers (superscripts) in the text. In addition, the sources are also usually listed in a bibliography.

 

Book Example:

Note

1. Jason Hickel, The Divide: Global Inequality from Conquest to Free Markets (New York:

W.W. Norton & Company, 2018), 85-87.

Shortened note

2. Hickel, The Divide, 122.

Bibliography entry

Hickel, Jason. The Divide: Global Inequality from Conquest to Free Markets. New York: W. W. Norton

& Company, 2018.

 

Journal Article Example:

Note

1. Matthew C. Canfield, "Disputing the Global Land Grab: Claiming Rights and Making

Markets Through Collaborative Governance," Law & Society Review 52, no. 4 (2018): 995-996.

Shortened note

2. Canfield, "Disputing the Global Land Grab," 998.

Bibliography entry

Canfield, Matthew C. "Disputing the Global Land Grab: Claiming Rights and Making Markets Through

Collaborative Governance." Law & Society Review 52, no. 4 (2018): 994-1025.

Chicago Style: Author-Date System

The Author-Date system is often used by those in the sciences and social sciences. This system briefly cites sources by listing the author's last name and year of publication using parentheses. These in-text citations correspond to complete bibliographic information provided in a reference list.

 

Book Example:

Reference list entry

Hickel, Jason. 2018. The Divide: Global Inequality from Conquest to Free Markets. New York: W. W.

Norton & Company.

In-text citation

(Hickel 2018, 120-122)

 

Journal Article Example:

Reference list entry

Canfield, Matthew C. 2018. "Disputing the Global Land Grab: Claiming Rights and Making Markets

Through Collaborative Governance." Law & Society Review 52, no. 4 (2018): 994-1025.

In-text citation

(Canfield 2018, 998)